Woodpeckers love.Ive lived in the country a long time, and most populations have a self regulating mechanism.The prairie dog population increases so the foxes increase.Too many foxes and distemper appears.We maintain our feeders, cleaning and disinfecting them and we pay to have our feeders filled when we are away on vacation.Our yard is also a certified NWF habitat so our gardens, trees and pond provide the natural food and habitat for the birds, the feeders are supplemental and we believe help to maintain our feathered friends in harsh winters.We purchase our seed locally grown without chemicals.We feed everything from Wrens to Crows and even have a female wild turkey that eats off our front step! Its hard to believe this could be harmful to the birds.Our feeders allow us to enjoy and respect wildlife.Perhaps its a give back for taking so much of the natural habitat from the animals.No species of birds are evil, no species of birds are mean.Its all about what they need to do to survive and take care of their young.Feed the birds and mammals, and enjoy watching these animals live each day.Its the least we can do to give back what humans have destroyed of their environment.Lots of people talk to animals, said PoohNot very many listen, though,LISTEN to them, RESPECT them.It may have some negative short-term aspects, but the long-term benefit of keeping perhaps millions of ordinary folks engaged in birds, and there subsequent financial and political support for bird-related issues and organizations, will be lost.I believe the most critical bird habitat in todays world is money and politics.Telling people to stop watching birds at their winter feeders may in fact be a very short-sighted conclusion, one which could ultimately cause their extinction though lack of funding and political distaste for the issue.However, some people do like to attract more birds so they feed them.I would be having the same problem as Patty Ciesla with Scrub Jays at my house.The jays are the biggest reason for nest failure that I have when doing NestWatch with Cornell Lad of Ornithology.It would attract them and we have a lot of them.I found a solution to that by feeding by hand! I use walnuts or mealworms.Towhees and a pair of Oak Titmice that we feed regularly.In the spring I can sometimes get a House Wren to take mealworms and one year I was also feeding her second brood of fledgelings.This winter I am trying to train a Hermit Thrush to take mealworms.I found a big upside to this feeding by hand.The birds more closely associate me with the food.They drop a lot of their fear of us and even when we are not actively feeding they will come by and check us out from just a few feet away, or closer! We get to see a lot of their behavior up close and personal.Its a lot more fun than seeing them twenty feet away at a feeder.And NO Scrub Jays! Maybe not a good solution for the harsh winters of the East Coast, but in mild climates its a fun solution.Still, I fill my birdfeeders daily with sunflower seeds, and even have a friend do the same whenever I take a vacation.I also hang suet blocks for the birds.Although the area is rife with chokecherry trees, by January the fruit is long gone, and it seems that only the squirrels are interested in the plentiful pine cones.